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A disability can be either permanent (for example, a hearing or mobility impairment) or temporary (for example, a treatable illness or temporary impairment that is the result of an accident).A disability can also be visible (for example, a wheelchair or white cane indicates the person has a disability) or invisible (for example, a mental illness).The only grounds for not accommodating an applicant or employee having personal characteristics protected by the Canadian Human Rights Act is if the exclusion is based on a bona fide occupational requirement (BFOR).

Modeled after the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin, the ADA is an "equal opportunity" law, not a benefit program entitling you to specific services or financial assistance because of your disability.

When the focus is on building an inclusive environment that is welcoming to people regardless of disability, you may need to make changes to work areas, consider technological modifications, make information accessible in alternate formats or make changes to tasks or working hours. Duty to Accommodate refers to the obligation of an employer, service provider or union to take steps to eliminate disadvantage to employees, prospective employees or clients resulting from a rule, practice or physical barrier that has or may have an adverse impact on individuals or groups protected under the Canadian Human Rights Act, or identified as a designated group under the Employment Equity Act.

This includes the hiring process as well as accommodating an individual once they are hired.

For a standard to be considered a BFOR, an employer has to establish that any accommodation or changes to the standard would create an undue hardship.

When a standard is a BFOR, an employer is not expected to change it to accommodate an employee.

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The national office is located in Toronto with an employment services office in Moncton, New Brunswick and project offices across Canada in Newfoundland, New Brunswick, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and British Columbia.

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